Why is feminine body parts inherently cursed & sinful?

Bunraku

Well-known member
Pudendum is latin for mid 17th century: from Latin pudenda (membra) ‘(parts) to be ashamed of’, neuter plural of the gerundive of pudere ‘be ashamed’. & was used for many centuries.

& I don't want to hear lipservice either or you posting about how much of a feminist u r. I want the truth.
 

bluerosepetals

Active member
It isn't inherently cursed or sinful (at least not any more than male), it was just portrayed that way throughout history, and it was likely used to encourage women to be modest and non-promiscuous. When something is seen as shameful, you will want to cover it up to avoid feelings of shame. I don't think this is a question of spirituality. It was happening because at the time it worked for society for a variety of reasons.
 

JUPITERASC

Well-known member
Pudendum is latin for mid 17th century: from Latin pudenda (membra) ‘(parts) to be ashamed of’,

Pudendum is a term that has been part of the formal anatomical nomenclature for a millennium.
Recently, the meaning of pudendum has been perverted :)
and misinterpreted

as synonymous with only the vulva
and to come from an etymological root term
with the narrowly defined meaning "...to be ashamed..."
neuter plural of the gerundive of pudere ‘be ashamed’. & was used for many centuries.

& I don't want to hear lipservice either or you posting about how much of a feminist u r. I want the truth.
The definition of pudendum, is external genitalia.
The term pudendum is used to describe external genitalia regardless of sex.

The labia majora, labia minora, clitoris, penis, scrotum, testes, and so on are all parts of the human pudenda.
The female pudendum is also called the vulva. Also, nonhuman species have pudenda.

The misunderstanding of pudendum is twofold.
First, pudendum describes the external genitalia indiscriminate of sex
however
terms such as pudendum muliebre/pudendum femininum and pudendum virile/pudendum masculinum

have been used throughout history to identify pudenda with respect to sex.

Second, the meaning of the root term pudere has been taken out of context :)
The meaning of the root term is inclusive of respect, modesty, honesty, honor, virtue, awe, veneration
and so on and has a positive connotation rather than a negative connotation, akin to sacrum, for example.


Indeed, pudendum shares its etymological root with the names of goddesses and saints :)
e.g.,

Pudicitia
Saint Pudens
Saint Pudentiana


These details regarding anatomical etymology
and
both the historical
and modern use of anatomical terminology related to pudendum
remedies the perversion of pudendum

and, in doing so, improves the anatomical lexicon

sources

REFERENCES

Adams, J. N. (1982). The Latin sexual vocabulary. London: Duckworth.

Albinus, B. S. (1734). Historia musculorum hominis. Leidae Batavorum:

Apud Theodorum Haak & Henricum Mulhovium.

Balgobin, S., Jeppson, P. C., Wheeler, T., 2nd, Hill, A. J., Mishra, K., Mazloomdoost, D., … Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Pelvic Anatomy Group. (2020). Standardized terminology of apical structures in the female pelvis based on a structured medical literature review. The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 222(3), 204-218.
Crane, G.R. (1985-2020). Perseus library. Retrieved from https://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/
FCAT. (1998). Terminologia anatomica. Stuttgart: Thieme Verlag.


© 2020 American Association of Clinical Anatomists
.
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
The “Woman = inherently sinful“ concept arose in older western culture from the ramifications throughout the Jewish, Christian & Muslim world of the biblical story (myth) of the garden of Eden and Eve’s role in the fall of man from grace; the idea is ultimately connected with the issue of sexuality and cultural perspectives regarding that issue.
 

waybread

Well-known member
Women's body parts are not inherently cursed and sinful. The Creative Principle of the universe does not make mistakes, or create something merely to label it as evil.

Some cultures have reinforced negative labeling of women's bodies. Some of these misogynistic cultures have real problems in acknowledging women as fully-developed human beings. In order to curb male lust, it is the woman who must hide and cover herself. But this is culture, not nature.

As women, too often we are taught to be ashamed of our bodies. It can be hard to unlearn negative childhood conditioning. But it can be done. It starts with self-acceptance.

The goddess Aphrodite (Venus) was often portrayed as naked. Her naked body in all its beauty was her glory.

The Egyptian goddess Nut, the primal goddess of sky and Milky Way, was often portrayed as naked.

Think of how women's genitals are essential to the birth of a child and the creation of all human life.

In a loving sexual relationship, the lover experiences the woman's secret places as desirable and beautiful.
 

JUPITERASC

Well-known member
Nah, female body parts are absolutely the most cursed and sinful (inherently so in fact).... but forbidden fruit taste the sweetest ☝
The “Woman = inherently sinful“ concept arose in older western culture from the ramifications throughout the Jewish, Christian & Muslim world of the biblical story (myth) of the garden of Eden and Eve’s role in the fall of man from grace; the idea is ultimately connected with the issue of sexuality and cultural perspectives regarding that issue.

pathetic that a documentary like this even had to be produced to answer a simple and basic question :)

 

Blaze

Well-known member
Human bodies are absolutely disgusting. Blood, pus, urine, poop, body odors, hair - yuck. Gross. :sick:

Deva bodies are free from those impurities, so they're actually beautiful. Still not worth chasing after.
 

JUPITERASC

Well-known member
Human bodies are absolutely disgusting. Blood, pus, urine, poop, body odors, hair - yuck. Gross. :sick:

Deva bodies are free from those impurities, so they're actually beautiful. Still not worth chasing after.
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Lykanized

Well-known member
Pudendum is latin for mid 17th century: from Latin pudenda (membra) ‘(parts) to be ashamed of’, neuter plural of the gerundive of pudere ‘be ashamed’. & was used for many centuries.

& I don't want to hear lipservice either or you posting about how much of a feminist u r. I want the truth.
The female body is associated with being cursed, sinful, and shameful as a projection of male inability to exhibit self control. That's all. It's not an inherent trait of men to lack that self control, but it is a tendency. It's easier to project one's own weaknesses onto the perceived source of powerlessness. Thus, the female body is cursed

What else is new?

I'm not sure if you'd consider this lipservice, but it's a genuine perspective and deserves some consideration
 
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