Hard times ahead, Survival and Prepping *Text only, no politics*

uranianplutonian

Well-known member
I liked watching Canadian Prepper’s videos for awhile, but then it seemed like every video started with, “you won’t believe what’s about to happen…”
He’s still got some good tips to pass on though in case there ever was some sort of apocalypse.
 

Blaze

Well-known member
I liked watching Canadian Prepper’s videos for awhile, but then it seemed like every video started with, “you won’t believe what’s about to happen…”
He’s still got some good tips to pass on though in case there ever was some sort of apocalypse.
That's the same reason I stopped watching his videos. Especially once the war in Ukraine kicked off. Dude started with those clickbait titles like: "yOu'Ve GoT tHiRtY dAyS lEfT! bUy mY sTuFf nOw!"

I find his older vids good though.
 

uranianplutonian

Well-known member
That's the same reason I stopped watching his videos. Especially once the war in Ukraine kicked off. Dude started with those clickbait titles like: "yOu'Ve GoT tHiRtY dAyS lEfT! bUy mY sTuFf nOw!"

I find his older vids good though.
And, “I’vE goT aN iNsIdE soURce WhO ToLD mE…”
I think that he came to a point where he realized he’s not in a lucrative market. I want to believe that he actually believes his stories because then at least he’s not intentionally invoking people’s fear to maintain some sort of a profit margin.

There’s a part of me that imagines a scenario where he was right the entire time, but it’s too late to buy his stuff. :biggrin:
 

JUPITERASC

Well-known member
.

was watching a geology channel saying that these heat waves might be caused
by the Hunga Tonga volcano eruption.
When it erupted some months ago it went super high into the stratosphere.
It is being put as a VEI 5-6. This is the explosive value of the volcano.
These volcanoes that reach this level are usually associated with global cooling for a few years.
Most of the time when volcanoes explode like this, they usually inject ash into the stratosphere
It is believed that Tonga injected water.
So instead of the injected material reflecting the suns radiance back to the sun
the water, which is considered a greenhouse gas, that was injected this time is acting like a magnifier.

This is believed to be causing earths heatwaves this year.


how significant an effect is shipping fruits, vegetables and meats, which contain mostly water
from one part of the earth to others
i.e.

effectly moving tons of water - unnaturally - from one part of the earth to others :)

.
 

JUPITERASC

Well-known member
.

we have a right to defend ourselves with guns and weapons.
how brilliant and perceptive the Nation's Fathers were.
James Madison knew the citizens had to have weapons

in order to preserve liberty and counteract a tyrannical federal government.



also :)




.
 

Blaze

Well-known member

This channel deserves more subs. His content is solid and great for anyone thinking of going into the great (but difficult) outdoors.

Prepping for the possibility that you'll need to escape your homestead is important. Never know when a riot, nuke or some other mess happens on your doorstep an it's time to run.
 

Blaze

Well-known member
I haven't recommended a book in awhile: https://www.amazon.com/dp/151076492...olid=1ZLM3R22BAE07&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

This is a great book to learn and practice from. The older one helped me learn to camp on my own in the woods. Sometimes for weeks on end. I imagine the updated version is even better.
Forgot an important one to add to this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/177213007...olid=1ZLM3R22BAE07&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

There is another book by Dave Canterbury - avoid that one at all costs. It's absolute shite.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Avoiding poison oak or ivy is important for most campers. And, keeping ants out of your food supply. Bread is EXTREMELY attractive to a lot of animals, and so is meat and anything sweet.
 

Blaze

Well-known member
Avoiding poison oak or ivy is important for most campers. And, keeping ants out of your food supply. Bread is EXTREMELY attractive to a lot of animals, and so is meat and anything sweet.
Nothing quite like stepping into a fire ant mound, barefoot.

Also a joy to see black ants swarming your bag since a mouse chewed a small hole into it and now it's a feast for all.....
 

david starling

Well-known member
Nothing quite like stepping into a fire ant mound, barefoot.

Also a joy to see black ants swarming your bag since a mouse chewed a small hole into it and now it's a feast for all.....
I was just thinking about wilderness ants, before I saw your post.
Anyone new to the wilderness and used to the tame little brown ants that can invade a house kitchen, are in for a shock! And to rodents, what's yours is theirs.

Getting up off of the ground helps. I carried a lightweight frame I could assemble and temporarily attach to low, wide spreading tree branches and cover with plastic sheeting to escape the bugs. Worked pretty well at the time. Three weeks was my longest outing, and that was in the High Sierras in early Fall before the rains started. LOVED that glacier water in pools and streams! Swimming in it was an exhilarating, balls-freezing delight! :lol:
 

Blaze

Well-known member
I was just thinking about wilderness ants, before I saw your post.
Anyone new to the wilderness and used to the tame little brown ants that can invade a house kitchen, are in for a shock! And to rodents, what's yours is theirs.
Oh man. When I was new to wild camping, I made the mistake of setting up a hammock. Not usually a big deal, right? Plus, the view was beautiful, overlooking a lake with a high cliff behind me. So, I laid on it and began eating, just enjoying the sights and sounds, the cool breeze etc. But then...ow, what was that? Something pinched my neck. Then another something. An another, an another. When I looked down, my chest had at least twenty big black ants crawling on it, all of them moving toward my shoulder to reach the bag of chips I stupidly opened.

The ants crawled on the ropes I used to tie the hammock and were swarming within ten minutes. Crazy. Now I know to use talcum powder on any ropes or hangers to keep them off. They hate the stuff.
LOVED that glacier water in pools and streams! Swimming in it was an exhilarating, balls-freezing delight! :lol:
Ahahahaha.

Last pond I bathed in had a waterbug nip me on the a'ss. Glad it didn't go for the balls. o_O
 

david starling

Well-known member
Worst ants in the trees in the High Sierra had black bodies and red heads, large and aggressive with a stinging bite. They hated smoke though, so sleeping next to a small, safe campfire would keep them away.
 
Top