Diabetes in young person -

minnimyriad

Active member
My son was recently diagnosed with diabetes. He is 23, slim and athletic so he does not fit the type two profile. But he did not have the antibodies that typically indicate type one. Type one is when the bodies immune system begins killing the beta cells (in the pancreas) that produce insulin. When this happens to young children it is very rapid but when it occurs in young adults, it can take several years to completely kills the insulin producing cells.

This is really causing all of us a lot of stress as we do not know what the prognosis will be. Presently he is controlling the disease with diet and very small amounts of oral medication. If this is type one he will deteriorate until he needs insulin shots for the rest of his life.

To complicate matter even worse he was diagnosed with the disease at the same time he was accepted to dental school for next year. If he develops neuropathy in his hands he will not be able to practice. He is extremely nervous about pursuing this career as he will need to get a huge loan for school. He will be in enormous debt and if he cannot practice he will be unable to pay it back. Already he has times when his hands shake but this is usually low blood sugar (from the medication).

I don't know how to attach the file with his birth chart but his birthdate is March 13, 1988 at 2:59 PM.

Presently in his progressed chart Progressed Pallas is square Progressed Pluto (exact),
Progressed Mercury is Square Saturn (April) and then Progressed Saturn
Progressed Venus is inconjunct Saturn (Jan) and progressed Saturn (August)
Progressed Mercury was square Saturn at the time of diagnosis (October)

Thanks
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
I can support the reference given by Sugar, above; also I advise consultation with practitioners of Chinese medicine (acupuncture and herbs), which school of healing has been quite successful with this condition; there are also certain low cost easily available Ayurvedic and Western herbs which are harmless and may be tried without fear of toxicity or significant side-effects. There are many options available which conventional medicine doesn't "believe in", but which are harmless and more often than not, quite helpful.
 

minnimyriad

Active member
Thank you for the links. Niacinamide, which is B3, when given in very high doses helps to stall the destruction of the beta cells. He is taking that along with magnesium, Co Q10 and B100. Alpha Lipoic Acid helps to reduce the blood sugar and is a powerful antioxidant. It also helps to detoxify the liver and kidneys.

Diabetics should not eat red meat because the protein and fat is dangerous contributing to heart and kidney disease. A vegan diet is best. I am trying to encourage him to incorporate more vegetarian food into his diet. His girlfriend is blocking all of this for some reason I do not understand. I believe it is expressed in his progressed Pallas being Square progressed Pluto (Scorpio). Pluto is in opposition to Venus in his birth chart indicating jealous, controlling loves. Pluto is also square his Ascendant.

Pallas is in his 6th house conjunct the Moon (ten degrees) so maybe this is the trigger. The progressed Pallas/progressed Pluto square has been forming for two years and progressed Pallas will be square natal Pluto in two more years. That really worries me.

There are trials being done using drugs to stop beta cell destruction. The most knowledgeable doctors are in the city he plans to go to school. They can diagnose him and give him the best treatment and prognosis. Again the girlfriend disagrees with him traveling (at my expense) to see a good doctor - she wants to travel elsewhere and is dismissing his diagnosis. This again seems to be progressed Pallas square pluto.

The Moon and Pallas are both in his 6th house, ten degrees apart. The moon according to the article controls the pancreas. It is in sextile the Sun and North Node (Pisces) in the 8th house. Both Pallas and the Moon are square Jupiter in the 9th. The Moon is square Juno.


Mars is conjunct Neptune in the 5th. Alcoholism runs in the family and he admits to binge drinking since high school, through college. Binge drinking can cause pancreatitis which can cause beta cell destruction. Mars is semi-square Ceres in the 7th which is opposition Lilith in the 1st. Other than that Mars is sextile Venus (in the 9th conjunct MC) and trine Pluto in the 4th. This eases the Venus/Pluto opposition.

Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in the 5th are all trine Jupiter. The Moon is sextile the Sun/north Node conjunction in the 8th house. I did not think there was a detriment to the Sun/North Node but now I see that the Saturn/Uranus conjunction form a square 8 degrees. Mars is sextile the Sun/North Node 10 degrees.

Chiron is conjunct Par of Fortune in the 11th , sextile the Ascendant. trine Mercury and Ceres (7th) , sextile Juno and Jupiter and sextile Lillith. It is square the Sun/North Node conjunction in the 8th.

I wish I could post the chart!
 

Olivia

Well-known member
Vegetarian diets are not good for everyone, and there's a higher rate of diabetes in vegetarian communities (Indian brahmins, for example) than in non-vegetarian ones. Just so you know. I've had Type 2 diabetes since a very young age, and didn't fit the profile, either. I know you're dealing with Type I, but sometimes it can happen, either variety.

The fat and protein in red meat are highly unlikely to contribute to kidney disease unless there's already a severe kidney problem, and it's really unlikely that they'd contribute to heart disease, either.

I think when it comes to diet you have to take into consideration the disease, but you also have to consider the chart of the person. Some people do well with being vegetarian or vegan, others do not. That's going to depend on temperament, largely.

I don't do well with vegetarian diet, and my diabetes was basically a non-issue for over 30 years. It's got worse recently, my blood sugar is a bit higher than normal, but that was set off by a series of infections - which are inevitable if you live in a place like I do. But vegetarianism made me worse when I tried it, so I stopped that. I've known people who've done well with diabetes whilst being vegetarians, and even some folks who can eat a fair amount of carbohydrates and still do well with diabetes - I can't, and it's against all logic, but there you have it.

If you have some moral or ethical objection to eating animal products, then you'll need find a way to work around it. But if there's one thing I've learnt from astrology it's that we're all individuals - even when it comes to illness, and especially when it comes to temperament and best diets. The 'same disease' can be caused by different factors in the different people. Western medical science doesn't often recognise this, but astrology does.

So vegetarianism or veganism may not be the answer for this young man. It's certainly not an absolute rule, and there's mounting evidence against it in general, though not - in particular. And it's the 'in particular' that we're concerned with here.

I do wish you the best with this, because I know how difficult it can be.
 

dhundhun

Well-known member
Your son is 23, slim and athletic. Why you are giving insulin sensitizers? That will trigger hypoglycemia and make conditions much worse.

Diabetes needs to be managed. Everyone has his/her own ways:

~ A doctor (allopathic) will manage through medicines, prescription medicines, insulin, lifestyle management (diet, exercise, stress) and so on.

~ Other's will also manage. For example a nutritionist may recommend B3, Niacinamide, MSM, Vitamin D3, etc. (excluded all the insulin sensitizers from list). Usually these supplements are used as Mega Doses.

~Ayurveda (Ancient Indian medicine system) has better management to offer if suits. Only ingredients of "Gymnema Sylvestre" has scientifically shown to increase Beta cells. The "Momordica charantia" is herbal insulin.

~ As long as it is type 2, Atkins diet also offers one of the best support. One of the references is http://altmedicine.about.com/od/popularhealthdiets/a/AtkinsDiet.htm

===
Bottom line is finding what works best and subsequently managing it.

Hopefully for mismanaged cases, continuous monitoring and continuous insulin injecting will become commercially available.

And hopefully, in 15-20 years, it will be possible to implant B-Cells in human body.

 
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dr. farr

Well-known member
As dhundhun mentions, Gymnema is a very important (and very safe) herbal medicine for many diabetic cases. It is also used (historically) in Chinese medicine as well as in Ayurveda, and has come into use in Western herbal practice over the past 20 years.
 

minnimyriad

Active member
Actually I got ALL of those supplements including gymnenia for him but he is not taking that one. There is a problem with his girlfriend scoffing at these alternative approaches, even the ones that are sanctioned by the American Diabetic Association or Mayo clinic as being helpful.

He is taking 2000 mg Nicainamide, 200 mg Co Enzyme Q10, 600 mg Alpha Lipoic Acid, 1000 mg Acetyl L Carnitine, 2000 mg vitamin D3, B100, 500 mg magnesium citrate and since he sprained his ankle, 500 DL Methionine, 500 Lycine and 100 mg hyaluronic acid.

I will tell him to also take the gymnenia s. Hopefully he will do so as his girlfriend is very controlling.

As for the vegetarian diet, Georgetown University did a study and the vegan diet reduced the blood sugar levels of all the type two participants, in some cases reversing the disease so that medication was no longer needed.
The ADA now says that red meat is harmful to diabetics because of the protein which causes kidney disease and heart disease, and it recommends diabetics avoid it. You can research this yourself but it is advocated everywhere - ADA, Bastyr Center, Mayo Clinic, etc.

My son's girlfriend has an aunt with brittle diabetes who eats meat and also a mother with pre- diabetes. The aunt was completely disabled within ten years of diagnosis. As the girlfriend wants my son to pursue a career that will leave him a quarter of a million dollars in debt and requires fine motor skills and coordination, it makes no sense to me that she does not want to acknowledge the latest breakthroughs in preventing neuropathy and organ damage. The hands and feet are the first to go in diabetics so obviously he needs to protect them however he can People just don't want to change their habits or be inconvenienced I guess.

I do believe not eating animals is a step forwards in our spiritual evolution.
All animals have spirit which we should have awareness of. This is another
block from the girlfriend as her family enjoys killing for pleasure, not for food. I believe we need to recognize suffering and want to eliminate it completely wherever we can. That is the only way the present consciousness can be restored to a peaceful existence - what was called the Garden of Eden. It becomes more and more obvious that without this shift in consciousness our planet is doomed.

On a more practical level of understanding the planet cannot feed the numbers of people living here if we all consume meat. It requires so much more land to produce animal protein versus vegetable protein. We have ruined our soil with chemical and petroleum based fertilizers, herbicides, insecticides etc. Meanwhile the animals we are eating at the high end of the food chain are loaded with toxins which we are consuming. I could go on and on but if your ears are deaf to this argument, it will make no difference.
I am drawn into because it is what I am facing in the girlfriend, who is agnostic and believes speaking of (or to) the eternal is as infantile as talking about the Easter Bunny.

Did I mention one of the known causes of type one diabetes is milk consumption? We are all being driven to spriitual evolution, like it or not.
 
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dhundhun

Well-known member
..., it makes no sense to me that she does not want to acknowledge the latest breakthroughs in preventing neuropathy and organ damage...

I am not sure, what you are talking about, but this is going to be helpful:

1. With diabetes, getting 70-80 grams of balanced protein, needed to sustain good health becomes difficult with vegetarian diet (because of calorie restrictions). Calculate it, how much it totals to.

2. It is important to maintain sugar lower than 160. Whether with monitoring or without monitoring. It has been found that with up to six tests a day, should be enough for management within limits. Every time blood sugar goes above 200, it causes some harm inside body - nerve, retina, organ, joints. For refraction tests, if it has gone above 200 for few hours, recovery of retina is about two weeks - so tests are deferred. This give idea about potential damages by high blood sugar.
 

minnimyriad

Active member
If you had a close family member diagnosed with diabetes you would pursue the latest information and breakthroughs about how to manage the disease; not out of date practices thrown into the trash bin five to ten years ago.

Science proves there is no argument about the vegan diet being superior for all diabetics. Low vegetarian protein, not high animal protein is healthier.
Try doing this search: Georgetown University-diabetes-vegan.

When my son was first diagnosed my first response was Atkins diet because, like most people, I thought "carbs are bad". But after careful research I found out I was wrong. It is processed refined foods that are bad. Complex carbs such as brown rice, barley, quinua etc are good and our bodies need them for energy. Nuts, seeds, legumes, good fats (like flax or olive) vegetables and fruit provide optimal nutrition for a vegetarian diet. Food that break down quickly into glucose, like white potatoes or white flour, should be avoided. Some diabetics cannot tolerate whole wheat either.

Apple cider vinegar helps lower blood sugar. You can use it on salads etc. Artificial sweeteners can cause depression, diarrhea and confusion so they should be avoided. Stevia is ok because it is natural. Very small amounts of honey or real maple syrup are ok. No sugar. Agave is used by some because it is a type of fructose so it is absorbed by the liver and released as glucose later. It does not immediately raise the blood sugar.

The ADA now recommends people eat chicken or fish and no red meat, but they also say the vegan diet is best. As I mentioned milk consumption is related to type one diabetes in some people. Some children, especially when they are given milk based formula as infants, develop an allergy to it. Beta cells, which produce insulin in the pancreas, are confused by the immune system as the milk casein and destroyed.

I have not eaten red meat for two and a half years. I have lyme disease and am on many antibiotics. My liver and kidneys do not need the extra stress. I am trying to change over to complete vegetarian. I was a vegetarian when I was young.

I hope anyone who reads this knows a little more about what is new in controlling diabetes as there are so many people inflicted with it. It is epidemic. I still don't know anything about how to determine if this is type one of two. I have to get him to a good doctor.
 

KellyWPA

New member
I am the person whose blog was referenced above. I saw a bunch of hits to my blog coming from here so was curious and followed the link back to here. I can’t offer much on the astrological discussion (that is why I pay Nic to do my chart!), but I did want to address a couple of things regarding diabetes.

You wanted to know about how to determine if he is T1 or T2. There are several tests, but there are two that are the most widely used. The first is a GAD-65 – that will tell if he has the antibodies for T1. The other is c-peptide and that will show how much insulin he is producing. There is an actual insulin test, but that test can’t differentiate between injected insulin and what is produced naturally. Even if he is not on insulin right now, you want to be able to compare apples to apples further down the road if he goes on insulin.

There is also another type that some people call T 1.5 and some people call it LADA – it is a slower onset version of T1. If he has that, it is possible he is negative for the GAD-65 antibodies now, but they can make an appearance a few years from now. Someone on one of the message boards said it took 3 ½ years for his to show up. His insulin levels can also decrease over time.

You were concerned about him getting neuropathy. With tight control, he has a very good chance that he will never have that happen to him. Treatment has come along way since I was diagnosed. I was diagnosed right around when home glucose monitors were just starting to be used and my doctor had to fight my insurance company to get one for me – now they are handed out like candy. Complication rates have also dropped because of tight control. I also have a Dexcom, which is a continuous glucose monitor – it checks my BS every 5 minutes and alerts me as soon as my BS goes over 120 over below 70.

As far as diet, there is still a lot of debate about that. I could not find anywhere on the ADA site that said no red meat – they recommend lean meat but I did not see anything that said no red meat. As far as the ADA goes, people that are in tight control tend to see the ADA as a joke. I suggest you check out TuDiabetes – it has over 19,000 members and you can really learn a lot there from people actually living with the disease. You will find a wide variety of opinions about things and get some valid discussions about some of these studies.

Some problems that I have heard with the vegan diets are people are getting big BS spikes after eating – those spikes have now been proven just as dangerous as staying high. Other people have said the people eating the animal diets for those studies did not cut down on carbs. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a T1 that actually became a doctor because of complications he had. He swears by a high protein, high fat, low carb diet. He recommends only 30 grams of carbs a day. He claims his complications turned around after changing his diet. He does have a lot of followers but his is a very hard diet to sustain. He is also very anti-fruit. I try to do lower carb (about 60 grams a day) but I don’t see a problem having some fruit as long as it doesn’t spike my BS. You can put peanut butter on an apple to slow down the rise in BS.

I suggest your son learn to eat to his meter. If I eat a couple baby carrots, my BS goes way up. Other people are able to eat them without a problem. The only way he will know is by testing. The standard line is to test 2-3 hours after eating. Most people in tight control test way before that. It is especially important when you are new to this and also when you try to new foods. What happens 30 minutes later is more important than 2 hours later.

You mentioned protein harming kidneys. Actually protein does not hut healthy kidneys, it is only a problem if you already have kidney damage.

You really need to take some of these studies with a grain of salt. A few years ago, they came out with the Accord study claiming that tight control killed diabetics – I had several doctors bring that study up to me. First of all, the study was done on T2s and I am T1 so it is not exactly comparing apples to apples. T2s traditionally have high cholesterol and high triglycerides. The study was also done on people that were overweight and not in good health to begin with. After doctors had it pounded into their heads that people in tight control were going to drop over dead, it came out that the study used Avandia, which is now known to cause heart problems. Unfortunately a lot of doctors know about Avandia but they don’t realize that was the drug in the Accord study & are still running around bringing up Accord and believe tight control is going to kill people.

You mentioned you have him on 600 mg of Alpha Lipoic Acid. Even though they say 600 mg a day is best, they also say that taking 200 mg three times a day is better than once a day. That is actually something they recommend for neuropathy and people have had good success with it for neuropathy.

A couple good books for learning about control are Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner & Using Insulin by John Walsh (if he goes on insulin).

Good luck!
 

minnimyriad

Active member
Thank you for taking the time to reach out to me. What you said about not developing neuropathy is very comforting. I had an uncle who had both legs amputated within ten years of diagnosis and my mother lost so much of her vision, she could hardly see. Both type 2.

I know about the tests and he has no antibodies now. I need to find out if he has had a c-peptide as he does not remember it. The doctor he saw believes it is LADA. At one point she suggested he get tested for MODY 2 or 3 but after research MODY, we found out he does not fit the criteria so I am encouraging him see a better doctor.

There is no type one I know of on either side of the family although the uncle who lost his legs is said to have been very slim all of his life but he was diagnosed later in life, when he was at least 40, I was told.

The monitor you have sounds great. That is reassuring. I have read they are developing an "artificial pancreas" which needs FDA approval. There are trial studies of drugs to halt the beta cell destruction and the doctor who has agreed to see him is at the head of one of these studies. He still has a lot of function left. Meanwhile. . . .

Here are some links about diet. I don't have specific ones bookmarked so I am searching online and bringing up what comes to the top.

Kidney disease - diabetes - vegan versus animal protein
http://www.kidney.org/professionals/kdoqi/guideline_diabetes/guide5.htm

This are a few of many places where you can get info about the Georgetown study.
American Diabetic Association
http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/barnard-vegan-diet.html
http://www.rd.com/health/should-you-try-a-vegetarian-diet-for-diabetes/
Mayo Clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes/AN00845
Bastyr
http://bastyrcenter.org/content/view/1371/

When I was originally doing my research I printed out the most compelling and recent studies from the most reputable sources. I gave it all to my son.

I realize there are conflicting viewpoints on how to treat illness and disease.
I myself have chronic lyme disease (and co-infections) and there are many different opinions on how to treat it - everything from it does no exist so don't treat it, to long term antibiotics, to expensive herbs of every description, to rife machines and light therapy (what in the world is that?).

We have to do extensive research and be our own advocates.

By the way, I had my ascendant in opposition to Neptune and progressed Neptune when I was bitten and got sick. It was an illness that went undetected and misdiagnosed for nearly two years. The antibiotics came when my Asc was trine Pluto. Still a struggle.
 

Olivia

Well-known member
Eventually you'll be able to pull apart study methodologies with a fine-tooth comb. I hope it's stopped, but in America I know at one point the ADA was saying that sugar isn't related to diabetes - and they also have sponsor companies for their organisation like Coca-cola.

In my country, one of the sponsors is a wheat growers society, so of course - wheat is good for diabetics. It isn't though, at least not for most of us.

And the folks at diabetes.uk have rightfully complained about some of the things their organisation pushes, as well.

The Accord study, and there was another one similar to it, can't remember which was which now - that were using Avandia, massive doses of insulin, and a couple of other drugs - all of which combined to kill people - that's what you get from Avandia, insulin increases the risk of heart disease (especially at the amounts these folks were given), throw in a couple more drugs, and it's a disaster. And of course the diets that those people were on that were driving up their sugars were the kind that would drive up sugars - lots of carbohydrates.

You have to look at things like THAT when you're reading studies, regardless of how prestigious or supposedly helpful a sponsoring organisation is supposed to be. Don't take them at their word, check the methodologies used.

Dr Bernstein (he's well into his 80s now) has most of his book online for free, and a lot of other information, and a forum. I find his diet a bit strict, too, but he makes a lot of sense. He's against fruit because fructose damages the liver, which is another thing diabetics have to watch out for - fatty liver disease happens to us. Doesn't mean I'll never eat a dozen grapes, but I do try to be careful most of the time.

I'm assuming you're in the US, because the book is titled differently in Europe, but Gary Taubes' 'Good Calories, Bad Calories' is very much worth a read. He's a science journalist with an advanced science degree who's researched the history of the obesity-and-diabetes epidemics, and it's a fascinating read. Lots of footnotes if you want to check things for yourself.

This lady keeps some nice intro sites and is usually up on the latest studies: http://bloodsugar101.com/

R-ALA, or racemic alpha lipoic acid, is much more bio-available than regular ALA.

There are diabetics out there who manage to maintain a vegan diet, if that is your son's wish - I found a few of them for a friend of mine. I expect it's a lot harder, and as I said, I couldn't even maintain on vegetarian, but I've been maintaining with normal to near-normal blood sugar without medicines for it since the late 1960s - though there was a period of time in there when it came down to ignoring the best medical advice at the time - when they started saying that protein and fats were bad (except hydrogenated fats, and ironically, those are the evil ones!) and carbohydrates are good, when for a great many of us, it's the other way round.

It can be done, in other words. Read critically, try not to freak out, it's not your son's fault that he got the wrong grandparents (it's genetic, even if it's Type 2), and for most folks - controllable. It takes a while to get used to it, and you'll fall off the wagon sometimes - everybody does - but hopefully not badly - don't set impossible standards. It takes time to adjust, is all. And if your son is vegan and wishes to remain vegan, then go find the folks who are vegan diabetics with good control and see how they manage it.
 

queenfluff

Well-known member
Hi mimimyriad,

I was recently Dx'd with diabetes about a year ago. First I will tell you, I have been a vegetarian for 20 years (yes 20 years!) and a vegan for 6 of those years. My choices to do this are for ethnical reasons and plus I am slightly allergic to dairy.

That said, being dx'd with diabetes when I thought I was a healthy eater was a big shock. I found out after that it runs in my family so mine is genetic. I was not overweight when I was dx'd nor have I ever been. (thus, that horrible steroetype that all diabetics are overweight).

I have to say though and while I am not against a vegan diet (obviously! since I am one) - I do not believe meat and dairy cause diabetes - and I am walking proof of that. Diabetes is such a complex disease that there are so many combinations of causes and different diets will work different for people. That said, it is the CARBS that you have to watch out for. (you didn't mention if your son was a Type 2 or 1 or if he was on any meds?), And of course real sugar. With that in mind, vegan diets are high in carbs. The vegan diet (referring to the results you get when you google diabetes vegan) are mostly recommendation for people who need to lose weight esp. if they are eating a diet that is high is saturated fats etc. But I will tell you that all you have to do is drop the carbs and you will lose weight - you don't have to become a vegan to lose the weight.

I lost a whole 30 pounds without even trying when I was Dxd and I was already skinny - I didn't need to lose any but because you have to cut down on portions and avoid high carb food to keep numbers in normal range (I practice below 140 because that is when damage can start occuring). The weight fell right off of me! Prior to that, I ate alot of carby food - bread, pasta, potatoes - those were my whole diet. Meat and cheese have no carb - they won't do much to your blood sugar. Your son will have to experiment with which foods he can eat and which he can't - he might be able to eat some of the high carb foods but you have to watch the portion on those.

To successfully do a diabetic vegan diet is a lot of restriction. Being a vegan won't cure or prevent someone from getting diabetes if it is in your genes. You might be able to hold it off longer by keeping in shape (exercise is really important for insulin sensitivity!)

I also had a lookie at Neil Bernards book when I was dx'd and I was surprised that it was higher carb than I was already eating as a vegan. I worked out a modified vegan diet for myself already before I looked at the book. It is a lot of sacrifice and work but I have no desire to go to back to be a meat eater and I tend to stay this way because I am happy with my vegan choices and I agree with your stance on killing animals. I slip up sometimes I have stuff I shouldn't have and I get some high numbers (but that is why the treadmill exists) but a few higher numbers aren't going to permanently damage you - you just start over again the next day with good numbers.

I take a bunch of vitamins too but mostly because since my portions and choices are cut down so much that I don't get all the stuff I need and they help out with that but not with blood sugar number. The best prevention of neuropathy and other d-related complications is control of the numbers and keep them within range most of the time.

Your son should do what works for him - this girlfriend doesn't sound very supportive and I can tell you getting diabetes is a quick way to find out who your "true" friends are in life and who really cares about you. It is a hard thing to learn sometimes but all for the better. If the girlfriend isn't going to be supportive of what your son needs to do to take of himself, he needs to seriously think about this relationship.

You didn't mention any astrological aspects of this? What is your son's chart like? I have Saturn in the 6th house - everyday restriction on food and health problem. Makes sense to me that I have diabetes now - of course it didn't happen until later in life for me but my Saturn is at the handle of a bucket pattern in my chart and so he is also a singleton. Diabetes becomes a big part of your life after you are dx'd. I am sure your son will do fine. It isn't a death sentence you know (although it sure feels like it at the beginning). It best to just take things as they come with this and do the best he can. :)

EDIT: Just wanted to add too about the LADA - since I was skinny when I was dx'd EVERYONE was saying that to me (other diabetic that is - NOT my doctor - boy, did I get sick of hearing that!) that you must be LADA because you are skinny. This is NOT necessariarly true. I was thin because I was already a vegan. Just because one doesn't meet the "stereotypical requirements" for a Type 2 doesn't mean they are a LADA. A year later I am still some sort of Type 2 just a thin one. Yes, the c-peptide should be tested when first dx'd - that will tell you whether you need insulin or not. If he wasn't prescribed insulin, than his c-peptide was probably fine if it was tested.
 
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minnimyriad

Active member
I really appreciate the information and support that he will be ok. It is very hard to accept


Born March 13, 1988 In Loveland CO at 2:59 PM
I can't get the file to load.

His Moon and Pallas are in his 6th house. The moon is sextile the Sun and North Node (conjunct) in the 8th house (sextile within 2 degrees) but square Juno in the 9th house (8 degrees). The Moon is square Jupiter in the 9th house (within 6 degrees)

Pallas is square Venus (3 degrees) and Jupiter (4 degrees) in the 9th house, and Pluto (7 degrees) in the 4th (Jupiter and Pluto are not close enough to be in opposition). Venus is in opposition to Pluto (5 degrees).

Progressed Pallas is now square Progress Pluto and in two years will be square Natal Pluto. It is exact.

Other progressions:
Time of diagnosis - Progressed Mercury square Natal Uranus and progressed Uranus.
Jan and August - Progressed Venus inconjunct (150) progressed Saturn and Natal Saturn.
May and August - Progressed Mercury Square progressed Saturn and N. Saturn.
August - Progressed Mercury sextile Progressed Venus.
September -Progressed Juno sextile progressed Ceres.

The transitions of Uranus, Saturn and Jupiter as well as the progressed Moon form several bad aspects to his natal planets until June. At that time things ease up.

He is accepted to dental school but worried about going. It is extremely expensive and will put him into enormous debt. If the diabetes causes him to lose function of his hands or vision problems he won't be able to practice.

I don't know what is in his chart that points to dentistry or a medical profession. He has Jupiter and Venus in the 9th house trine Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Mars in the 5th. I wonder if a profession related to education would be a better fit. He loves children.
 
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queenfluff

Well-known member
Your welcome! Yes, one thing to remember for your son is don't let diabetes in the way of anything you want to do. You don't know what will happen down the road. So, he shouldn't give up his dream of being a dentist (if that is what he really wants to do). It takes a looong time to develop complications if he is a good controlled diabetic. It is the ones who ignore their diabetes, don't test, don't exercise, always have super high number and don't take control of it that have the complications. I worry about this stuff too but all I can do is do my best and take stuff as it comes. Your son is young (young than me- I'm 41) - don't let all the worry about what might be with this overcome his life.

I don't hear too much about neuropathy in the fingers as much as the feet although - if it makes you feel any better. The feet, legs and the eyes are more the worry for that. But as I said before, if he takes control of it, he should do well. The first year is the hardest. Ignoring it is the worst thing you can do (btw, I had the same problem with my bf of the time when I dx'd - he wanted me to ignore it. He had more trouble facing it than me - don't know why - I was the one who had to deal with it not really him! We not together anymore basically because of that.)

I did your son's chart and loaded it for you. I am a newb at chart interpretation with careers are such so some of the others might be better with that.

EDIT: I forgot to put Pallas etc in there so I redid it and just did a reload again.
 

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minnimyriad

Active member
Thanks you for uploading his chart. I tried but it kept coming up file invalid.

So What do you all see in his chart ?

His birth certificate says he was born 3:04PM but I rectified it and 2:59 is more accurate. Even if you move the time way back, the fifth and ninth houses seem to be more important as far as career. It seems the 6th house just points to his diabetes. With Pallas forming an exact square with Pluto right now, it seems to indicate a problem in his sixth

Looking at progressed Juno sextile progressed Ceres and progressed Mercury sextile progressed Venus, I feel something will be resolved in the late summer/fall.

How does Pluto affect his fourth house? He is really good at building things.
 

Olivia

Well-known member
Your son is in a 12th house profection year now - since this recent birthday, and that can be rugged because he's got a detrimented Moon in 6 sextile Sun in 8. That could be part of the diabetic marker, and a 12th house profection brings Cancer to the profected ascendant for him - which is ruled by that detrimented Moon.

I'm not wild about that Mars-Venus trine, either, as Taurus is the place of Mars' detriment, so you don't want Mars in it or aspecting it, and that, along with the trine from Saturn to Jupiter with Venus and Jupiter conjunct could be another part of it.

All in all, though, it's a nice looking chart, and I think he'd be successful at most anything he turned his hand to. His main vocational planet is Mercury, which is angular and does well in Saturn's signs, and that rules his 11th house, which is where Fortuna lives, and is trined by its ruler, Mercury. That could be the dentistry. Sun is conjunct the NN in 8, which could also be beneficial to his career, as the 8th house rules surgery. 6 rules dentists, and even though the Moon is detrimented there, it is in hayz, so it has some dignity.

A career in the arts also wouldn't be out of place with Venus and Jupiter on the MC, especially considering that Venus rules the MC.

I think he's likely to be successful whatever he turns his hand to - but this year is probably going to be difficult for him - 12th profection years often are, and with his Moon detrimented, it'll make it more difficult. Getting a diagnosis of diabetes is a bit of a knock, as you know, and that first year can be fairly freaksome with dealing with that, information overload, whether he needs to be on medicine for it (metformin is the best bet if he doesn't need insulin but does need something - it can cause tummy upset but doesn't have the truly evil side effects that some diabetic medicines do), and diabetes generally places restrictions on your life that take a bit of getting used to. Very 12th house, restrictions on freedom.

His profected MC is in the 9th house this year, and it's in good shape, so this might be the year to work out what he wants to do, and if it requires further education, to start applying to universities, with the intention of starting school next year.

Transits to his natal Moon will be the ones to really look out for this year, for good or for ill - they'll likely have the biggest impact on his life.

Best I can do for a quickie reading without looking at solar returns and primary directions, but profections are usually quite reliable. I've no idea why they fell out of favour in the early 20th century, they aren't difficult to calculate and they're good predictors.

ETA: You can find a short explanation of profections here: http://www.astrology-x-files.com/help-do4/profections.html
 
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Caro

Well-known member
minnimyriad

just to add I know a number of people with this illness (type 1 and 2) and many live 'normal' lives managing their illness very effectively.

my understanding is they think that type 1 is bought on by a virus of some sort - that was something I read fairly recently.

The vegetarianism - is something that i have had to give up for health reasons as I become allergice to fruit and vegetables! so for me it is diet that does not suit my metabolism. I dont eat a lot of meat but find I really benefit from occasionally eating beef!(all the iron)

hope things work out for your son.
 

minnimyriad

Active member
Thank you both for the encouragement and for doing your interpretation of his chart olivia. I am not very good at analyzing houses.

He has agreed to see the doctors in the city where he has been accepted to school and once they give him the go ahead I think we can all relax. They are some of the best endocrinologists in the country so they are up to date and can be trusted.

The doctor who agreed to see him is conducting research and trials for halting beta cell destruction. His girlfriend has opposed him going as she complains he would be part of a dangerous experimental drug trial but I have told him it is best to make informed decisions rather than emotional ones.

He is not on metforim. He takes a drug that stimulates the pancreas to produce more insulin; glipizide I think. We recently found out this drug also burns out the remaining cells he has and he has already doubled his dose. So these research doctors will know the best medication for him to take. This better explains my anxiety about what is happening; particularly the girlfriend blocking him from seeing a good doctor.

For fun, and to test his fine motor skills, desire and ability to work with precision on small details, we are going to make Ukrainian Easter eggs. We will start with an easy one to see. When he applied to school they asked about this ability and some women students said they enjoyed cross stitch. It makes me nervous. As being a doctor/dentist was primarily his girlfriends idea, based upon projected salary, I think he needs to consider what he is best suited for.

His progressed venus continues to be semi-square his progressed sun so he is confused about what is best for him versus someone else's desires.

He is having the worst year of his life, since diagnosis, but he has been very cheerful about it. Things pick up for him in June-July.
It is true he could be good at whatever he decided he wanted to do. He was accepted to every school he went to an interview. He is a good person, very calm and easy going. I don't want him to get deeply into debt pursuing a highly specialized education that he either does not really enjoy or he cannot do because of diabetes.
 
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