Declination Stelliums

astro485

Active member
If you have 3 or 4 planets which are parallel by declination one another, would they count as a stellium, and if so, would major aspect by longitude to one of the members of the declination stellium aspect all the members of the stellium .
 
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conspiracy theorist

Well-known member
I've wondered the same thing. From the astrological principle of declinations it's logical, but there are not many authoritative voices talking on the matter so I understand the reticence.

I've seen Alice McDermott (Alice Portman) demonstrate on her website the efficacy of the "declination stellium" in the chart of Barack Obama. I think the definitive literature on the matter of declinations is from Kt Boehrer. I haven't read her so unsure if she tackled the issue of declination pileups.

I have some of that going on my chart. Close enough declinations among Moon, Saturn and Pluto to qualify as a three-way parallel. I think it has real relevance in my chart and life.
 

conspiracy theorist

Well-known member
Oh I forgot to mention. If I add longitudinal aspects to the parallels then I'd have a 10 planet mega conjunction. Even if that were "legal" I still would have a problem with it. It brings to mind primeval soup or the phase prior to the first act of creation in myths the world over. Maybe it denotes a rare spiritual opportunity, but I try not to get ahead of myself.
 

astro485

Active member
Thank you conspiracy theorist .

The common sence tells that if planets conjunct in declination or longitude
they become one so anything one planet feel the other planet conjunct feels also so they kinda share with each other their reality by longitude and i am
almost sure but kinda thought maybe there is a good source for that assumption .
 

waybread

Well-known member
I do look at declination occasionally. I think it is really important.

I keep the orb to one degree. Maybe two for a luminary.

I don't know about the OP longitude question, but it's worth doing some research on it.

I have a very wide moon-Pluto conjunction with a 10-degree orb. But they are parallel within a degree. Oftentimes parallel or counter-parallel planets will sharpen or clarify what is already in a chart.

The other helpful thing about declination is in identifying out-of-bounds planets. (Declination greater than 23 degrees 27 minutes.) They are the "wild children" of the horoscope.
 

astro485

Active member
Hello waybread ,

I have my moon parallel Neptun Uranus and Jupiter with in 1 degree also
all 4 of them in the 4th house .
I consider the planets Neptun Uranus and Pluto as making
the out of bound effect when connected to personal planets because
they are very far in our solar system kind of out of bound they are
very spirtual and transforming so major aspects of personal planets
with them makes things complicated and unusuall .
I noticed that many of the guys coming to this forum have this aspects
with the above planets .
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
If you have 3 or 4 planets which are parallel by declination one another, would they count as a stellium, and if so, would major aspect by longitude to one of the members of the declination stellium aspect all the members of the stellium .

For me I regard any parallel as superseding in delineative importance any longitudinal aspect between the planets in parallel.
 

david starling

Well-known member
For me I regard any parallel as superseding in delineative importance any longitudinal aspect between the planets in parallel.

I prefer the Ecliptic as the 0 degree marker, rather than the Equator. Not easy to calculate though, because all of the declination listings are for the Equator.

The closer to the Ecliptic, the stronger the effects. Notice that the Ascendant, which is the precise point of Sunrise, the Nodes, and the Sun itself, are always ON the Ecliptic. Whether a planet is above or below the Ecliptic doesn't factor in as far as I can tell--just closer is stronger. So, if one planet in a stellium of several planets is markedly closer to the latitude of the Elicliptic (which is the same as the Sun's latitude relative to the Equator) I consider that a significant factor in regards to its strength rating.

[The "Ecliptic" appears from our vantage point here on Earth, to be the plane of the Sun's orbit around the Earth. In Heliocentric coordinates, it's the plane of the Earth's orbit around the Sun.]

The circle of the Ecliptic is where we measure the the 12 equal Sign divisions, the Houses, and the Placements of the lines of longitude. So, it's of paramount importance, imo.
 
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david starling

Well-known member
Continuing from my previous post, when 2 or more planets (Moon included) are extremely close in Equatorial latitude, they are "in harmony" when they're on the same side, north or south of the Equator (parallel). And, "in disharmony" when on opposite sides (contra-parallel).This affects their relationships when it comes to longitudinal conjunctions, oppositions, and aspects.

For example, they can be in longitudinal conjunction, or trine, but not harmonious if contra-parallel. And in opposition or square, and still be harmonious if they're parallel.
 
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astro485

Active member
For me I regard any parallel as superseding in delineative importance any longitudinal aspect between the planets in parallel.

In the case i mentioned one of the planets in parallel to 2 other planets is far by longitude from the 2 others by 19 degrees of longitude and that planet trines Mercury
is it possible that the other 2 because of the declination contact trine mercury
as well ?
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
Yes it’s possible but for me I doubt if I would incorporate this into my delineation; I always try to get clear cut delineations.
 
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