Astrologers Versus Astronomers

david starling

Well-known member
Btw, there was NEVER an ancient god named "Uranus".

It was "Ouranos" in Greece and "Caelus" in Rome. Same god, different names, like Zeus and Jupiter, and Hermes/Mercury.

The astronomers really s¢rewed up on this naming, in more ways than one!
 

david starling

Well-known member
There's more to Urania than astrology and astronomy. She's also considered a Muse of poetry and the Humanities in general.

Her effect in a chart is to raise intelligence levels and inspire solutions to problems in surprising ways. Definitely a benefic.
 

bluerosepetals

Active member
Astronomers use scientific methods and plausible evidence that is removed from subjecive bias, or at least it seems so... and that is valued in today's age of science. Anything that is "mystical" is losing value, including even religion in the West. So it doesn't surprise me that astronomers look down on astrology, especially when their field is mistaken for "all that astrological mumble-jumble". So it is degraded to this "pseudo-science" (really a derogatory term - infers that it's a lie and a way to con people). It's not even given a chance to be considered at least a belief - as that would give it some more respect in society. Astrology can never truly be proven by scientific methods (and especially not by people who do not even grasp the basics of it, and instead make research based on Sun signs alone), and yet those who use it see that it works in eerily precise ways.

As for the names given by astronomers, I really do believe that many of them were given almost subconsciously. Pluto was discovered during the rise of dictatorial movements (not a coincidence), just to give an example.
 

david starling

Well-known member
I read that the ancient Greco-Roman astrologer/astronomers LITERALLY prayed to the Muse Urania for inspiration.

And, that John Milton, the author of "Paradise Lost" and "Paradise Regained", specifically attributed his poetic inspiration to the Muse Urania, about a century earlier than the discovery of the first planet outside of Saturn's orbit.
 
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david starling

Well-known member
John Bode was the famous astronomer who first proposed the bogus name "Uranus", and had considerable influence because he was instrumental in helping to locate the planet. His explanation was about lineage--Mars was the son of Jupiter, who was the son of Saturn, so Saturn should be the son of the next named planet.

However, the firm tradition was to use the names of Roman deities, not their Greek equivalents. So, for some unexplained reason, he unnecessarily violated tradition and actually made up a latinized version of the Greek name that the Romans never used.

If he had suggested "Caelus", which WAS the Roman name for Saturn's father, it most likely would have been readily accepted without question. So, what went wrong? It took nearly 70 years for astronomers to finally settle for "Uranus", simply because the next planet outside the orbit of Saturn, Neptune, had already been named, and they STILL hadn't come up with any other agreed-upon name for the first one.
 

david starling

Well-known member
As for Pluto, that name had a tremendous practical advantage over hundreds of other suggestions: It honors the name of the astronomer who was definitely the one who made it possible for Clyde Tombaugh to locate that far away planet: Percival Lowell, with the initials PL.

The astronomers use a combined PL as the symbol for Pluto, instead of :pluto:.
 
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david starling

Well-known member
I'm now using "Uran" as the name of the planet located by Herschel in 1781. The astrology symbol :uranus: honors Herschel, since it was deliberately designed as the letter "H" above the orb. But the name "Uran" honors BOTH the Greek version for the name of the original Greek deity of the Heavens, Ouranos, AND the Latin name for the goddess of the Heavens, Urania.

So, "Uran" can represent them both.

The name Urania, that being her Roman name, maintains the tradition of having all of the planets with Roman names. It's also fitting, because finding the planet with her name was due to her inspiration as Muse of astronomy.
 
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david starling

Well-known member
The name "Neptune" met with very little resistance for 2 reasons: The color of the planet is sea-blue, and Neptune was the brother of Jupiter and son of Saturn.

That was another advantage for using the name Pluto: Jupiter, Neptune, and Pluto were the three brothers, in that order, who became known as the 3 gods with "Earthly Authority" after defeating Saturn in the War of the Titans.
 

Opal

Well-known member
Btw, there was NEVER an ancient god named "Uranus".

It was "Ouranos" in Greece and "Caelus" in Rome. Same god, different names, like Zeus and Jupiter, and Hermes/Mercury.

The astronomers really s¢rewed up on this naming, in more ways than one!
Yes. I believe most Germans use Ouranos, and a different symbol.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Yes. I believe most Germans use Ouranos, and a different symbol.
Breaking the tradition of all Roman names avoids the use of the Roman name Caelus. It also hints at the name Ourania, which was Urania in Latin.

There are a number of observatories around the world named for Urania.

The Muse will not be denied her rightful place as goddess and Muse of astrology and astronomy!
 

david starling

Well-known member
Anyone actually believe in Muses?

If not, what about a modern psychological explanation for what was originally meant by a "Muse" as a source of inspiration? And, is it a real thing? I personally believe it is, and although I don't pray to it as was once done, I feel I can "access" it.
 

david starling

Well-known member
As I posted earlier, I am in full agreement about these spiritual creatures, who I believe are as real as you and me!
I've never had a vision or heard voices regarding them. But....I literally used to have imaginary conversations with Urania in the early 1980s, telling her that she'd picked the wrong astrologer to inspire knowledge about the tropical Ages, because I don't have the right chart to be able to convince other astrologers. Her imagined response was, it was the only sort of chart that enabled her to get the message across in the first place. Just do the best you can.

[I have Moon conjunct and parallel Venus in Aquarius in H12, trine and parallel with Uran(ia) in Gemini in H4. Also, although not conjunct Uran(ia), my NN is in H4 Gemini.]

Maybe I should have told Deborah Houlding about it! :lol:
 
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david starling

Well-known member
Interesting physical characteristic of Uran(ia): Unlike the "invisible to the naked eye" planets Neptune and Pluto, which are named for gods who were hidden beneath the sea and in the Underworld, the first planet on-beyond-Saturn actually is visible, IF one knows when and where to look for it--kinda like astrological correlations!
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
Historically, according to his autobiography, Lilly invoked angels and learned at least some of his astrology thru a ceremonial form of scholastic magic involving angels.
 

Bunraku

Well-known member
Astronomy, science, engineering, etc. involves rigorous study of math, physics, chemistry, etc.... They all work to create/discover new theories, concepts, technologies, etc. It puts men on the moon and to outer space. They do useful things that benefit society.
VS
Astrology/astrologers talk nonsense and do nothing important on obscure forums. The evidence is in the past few pages of this thread where it talks about nothing useful or important. The only ground astrology has to stand on is citing its historical significance which just proves how useless and irrelevant it is in todays world.
 
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