Anyone actually believe in Muses?

david starling

Well-known member
If not, what about a modern-day psychological explanation for what was originally meant by a "Muse" as a source of inspiration in ancient times, all the way up to at least the end of the 17th Century A.D.?

And, is it something real? I personally believe it is, and although I don't personify or ritualistically worship it, I feel I can access it.

In fact, I associate each astrological indicator with a type of inspiration I can access and use in my life--even mean old Saturn, although only in times of emergency.

To keep all of the names of the planets Latin, I'm using "Urania", a very well-known name among astronomers, including some observatories around the world named for her as Muse of astronomy. That's in place of "Urano" (in Spanish), or "Uranus" (in English), because those are Greek, rather than Latin.

"Urania", on the other hand, IS Latin for "Ourania", and was actually the Roman name for her. Whereas the masculine version in Greek, "Ouranos", was known as "Caelus" in Latin. The meaning is "the Heavens" in both cases, and is also what Uranus, Urano, and Urania are referring to.

Keeping it Latin!
 

david starling

Well-known member
The planet :uranus: is my source of inspiration for astrology, associated with the "Uran" prefix, both feminine and masculine. So, I just call it Uran, which includes both genders.

For strength, I access Jupiter, Mars for competitive sports and martial arts. Venus and Neptune for landscaping, and Mercury for inventiveness. Etc. So, I guess I consider them all "Muses" of a sort, in different categories.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Here's a question: How does the "most Greek of the gods" and patron of the 9 Muses, and #1 son of Zeus, fit into the hierarchy? I'm surprised he's been left out in astrology. I associate him with the Ascendant, personally speaking.
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
Yes, most books about the western esoteric tradition talk about the concept of hierarchy; eg, gods/goddesses, angels, intelligences, elementals, fairies, spirits, etc.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Yes, most books about the western esoteric tradition talk about the concept of hierarchy; eg, gods/goddesses, angels, intelligences, elementals, fairies, spirits, etc.
The 9 Muses were all full fledged goddesses by lineage, according to ancient Greco-Roman religious mythology.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Where would a prophetic goddess who's name meant "of the Heavens", and who taught astrology/astronomy to mortals seeking scientific knowledge, and was the daughter of Zeus/Jupiter and the Titan who's name meant "Memory" (Mnemosyne), fit into the schema of esoteric hierarchy?
 

david starling

Well-known member
Well, it's the Hot Topic board, so I may as well harp on the matter. :innocent:

I think "Urania" would have been a FINE name for the newly discovered planet in 1781. Culturally, though, it was problematic. The other two "feminine" planets are about nurturing and eroticism. But, important goddess that she was, a  female science teacher as lady of the planet that male scientists had just discovered??? :surprised: Preposterous!

Think about the ancient astrologers that are always referred and deferred to--how many were women? NOW of course we have Deborah Houlding who has gained some respect, along with a LOT of other excellent female astrologers. But way back when, it was a man's profession.

Care to comment? :wink:
 
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david starling

Well-known member
Same with the medical profession. Women who practiced herbal medicine were "witches". Men were "doctors".

In the 4th Century A.D., Hypatia became the head of the Alexandrian scientific community, by virtue of her mathematical and astronomical ability. Couldn't have THAT, now could they?
Btw, Hypatia WAS a practioner of astrology, although modern-day historians are loath to admit it. All her written works were destroyed when she was killed, so her astrological contributions were lost.
 
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dr. farr

Well-known member
Yes, and this great Neoplatonist was hacked to death by an enraged Christian mob, ending the glory days of old Alexandria…
 

dr. farr

Well-known member
Ms Houlding has made very valuable contributions to our art; personally I can’t stand her, and I was banned from her site years ago; nonetheless, her works have been of stellar quality and I thank God she chose to grace our ancient art.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Yes, and this great Neoplatonist was hacked to death by an enraged Christian mob, ending the glory days of old Alexandria…
She was an "advisor" to a rival of the Bishop of Alexandria. Must have been some good astrological advice, because the Bishop declared her a witch and exhorted his followers to kill her.
 

david starling

Well-known member
Ms Houlding has made very valuable contributions to our art; personally I can’t stand her, and I was banned from her site years ago; nonetheless, her works have been of stellar quality and I thank God she chose to grace our ancient art.
I'm curious about what you posted that got you banned, if you don't mind saying...:unsure:
 

david starling

Well-known member
:uranus: is being referred to as the "higher octave" of :mercury:.

Notice the similarities in these archetypal lineages:

The Roman god Mercury was a son of Jupiter and grandson of Saturn.
The Roman goddess Urania was a daughter of Jupiter and granddaughter of Caelus (Roman name for Ouranos).

So, if Mercury can have his name associated with a planet and be a sign dispositor, why can't Urania?
 
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