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StelliumGoat
12-06-2006, 08:03 PM
I have to take my wisdom teeth pretty soon. I'm probably gonna be taking them out the second week of January. I was just wondering is this a good time to do it? Will it go smoothly or will it go badly based on my natal chart?

I usually use astro.com for my charts but have no clue in how to post them here on the forum, help would be greatly appreciated.

For now, I'll just put up some details which might help someone in interpreting this for me.

Sun = Aqu
Moon = Libra
Mercury = Aqu
Venus = Cap
Mars = Taurus
Jupiter = Taurus
Saturn = Cap
Uranus = Cap
Neptune = Cap
Pluto = Sco

1st House = Cap
2nd House = Pisces
3rd House = Aries
4th House = Taurus
5th House = Gemini
6th House = Gemini
7th House = Cancer
8th House = Virgo
9th House = Libra
10th House = Scorpio
11th House = Sag
12th House = Sag

23
12-07-2006, 12:27 AM
I had mine taken out last week and as sore said, teeth and bones are ruled by Saturn, which is in leo at the moment (detriment) and is retrograde. Ideally you should have them out after saturn moves out of leo or at least until it goes retrograde.

Based on your outer planets, you seem quite young (maybe born in about 1990 which would make you coming onto 17). Ideally wisdom teeth should be taken out when you are under 21, so you have still a lot of time for all the saturn stuff to sort out and have them taken out at a good age. Otherwise you could have possible problems like I had:

http://www.astrologyweekly.com/forum/showthread.php?p=26402#post26402

Saturn moves into virgo by about Sept next year.

Draco
12-07-2006, 02:25 AM
Agh! How could anyone have their wisdom teeth removed if it isn't essential just to save future discomfort? Is it essential?

I have a nightmare phobia of dentists, and I need a back tooth seeing to myself, but I know I'll have it pulled and I just can't face it. I had one done once and it was a real botched job, the dentist in fact broke the tooth next to the one he was extracting in half - which is now the one that I need seeing to, but I do not trust dentists. I showed the tooth I had pulled to another dentist, and he said it only required filling, so all had been unecessary.

With Saturn in detriment in Leo, teeth and bones are more susceptible to wear and damage than at other Saturn periods. I wonder however if Saturn in Leo is such a bad time to have teeth pulled? If a tooth is being pulled out, then naturally, it is having something detrimental done to it, so having Saturn in detriment has more essential sympathy with the event, than if Saturn was in Aquarius or Capricorn.

Just my thoughts, although I do wonder about Saturn in Leo in relation to dental work. I wonder if dentists really do get more business in Saturn detriment periods?

A glance at transits etc. to the natal is insightful in relation to the issue, but you are better off trying to have foresight a set an event chart for the best time to schedule your appointment to ensure that all will go well, you will be as relaxed as possible and that the event will over and done with as can be.

Then take the possible candidates for the best event chart and make comparisons to your natal to see which would bring most benefit.

I need to come to terms with needing to ascertain such an event chart myself. :(

23
12-07-2006, 02:55 AM
The detriment of a Leo or a Cancer Saturn to teeth being pulled out might be more sympathetic to that action but what is left behind is the trauma left to the jaw that requires healing and it might be detrimental to this.

Wisdom teeth must be removed if they are impacted (ie growing at angle into the back molars or a lack of room). If they are not removed, it can result in severe absesses and destruction of molars that have already erupted. Also what happens is that the nerves of the wisdom teeth can fuse with other molars' nerves making them incredibly difficult to remove them if impaction/infection occurs leading to nerve damage. They also grow into the jaw and can interfere with nerves that provide sensation to the bottom lip if they need to be removed. It is a serious issue, it has nothing to do with discomfort, it has to do with serious health implications.

Draco
12-07-2006, 03:53 AM
I'm not sure I actually understand what wisdom teeth are meant to be. Are they not just the back teeth in adults?

What you said worried me, if when I have this back tooth of mine out, and if it turns out to be a wisdom tooth, then could that cause nerve damage? I've been a victim of malpractice in in the past, and I'm wary enough of dentists as it is. :(

StelliumGoat
12-07-2006, 04:04 AM
Thanks so much for responding, you guys. I'm actually 17 (born in 1989). My wisdom teeth haven't come out yet, they are just barely under the gum, but my dentist said that I should have them taken out because I have no room in my jaw for them. It seems from x-rays that my bottom two are pushing against the rest of my teeth and one of top ones might even grow out sideways (scary!) I really just want to have the surgery and get it over with.

I can really relate to you Draco, cause a few years ago I still (amazingly) had a few baby teeth left and they wouldn't come out. One of my adult teeth (canine, I think it's called) started to grow out my gum, and my dentist had to remove my baby tooth, so that my adult tooth would have room. He also removed the other baby teeth for fear that the same would happen to them. At this time 2 or 3 of the teeth came out somewhat easily but one of them broke in half, after about what seemed 15 mintues or more of pulling he finally got the **** tooth out. All the adult teeth grew in fine, except for the canine which is much higher than the rest of my teeth. I just wish I had gotten it out sooner, then I would have a 100% straight smile.

I guess the reason I'm so anxious about getting the surgery done, is because of my past story. I'm scared that if I don't do it in time, that my teeth will all come out messed up.

P.S. Wisdom teeth, I think are some form of primitive teeth that the first cave people had because of the food that they ate. Nowadays, people don't really need their wisdom teeth, but you don't have to take them out if they don't bother you or if you have room. Which apparently I do not.

P.S.S. (or whatever) Thanks 23, for the link to your thread about sinusitis and stuff. I, too suffer from pollen allergies and frequently get sinus infections and ear infections. I think I might have have one (sinus infection) right now as I haven't been feeling very well the last few days, must go to the doctor. (I think I should've been born a virgo, as I sound like one so often, at least stereotypically - I don't know any virgos except my mother who has a stellium in virgo and she's such a worrywart when it comes to her health, then again who wouldn't be?)

23
12-07-2006, 05:49 AM
SG - I had the same problems as you, the bottom ones were growing sideways into the next teeth and they were pushing them all and I was getting funny sensations in them. There was no room for the top ones. One top one was completely out.

I've had major issues with my teeth, being an Aqu sun with opp cancer saturn. I had baby teeth til the age of 28 and I still have one canine growing out. I've had about 10 baby teeth pulled out by dentists as they wouldn't come out.

Draco - As SG said, wisdom teeth are teeth erupt at about 17 years of age. In primitive times, adults only had a life expectancy of about 30 and many lost their teeth by the end of their teens. Wisdom teeth erupted as a last set (right down the back of the jaw) to humans compensate to provide them some teeth until death. Of course, there was no impaction then because there were no teeth left in the back of the mouth! Since then, dental health has been better and we have kept most of our teeth, so now when they grow they can impact on teeth (or molars) that are already there.

Frisiangal
12-07-2006, 08:39 AM
If I heard and remember it correctly, the 'wisdom teeth' are the remains from our animal-like tendancies. Humans have, I believe, 32 teeth; certain animals more. As wisdom teeth are the back molars, for the ability of breaking up food for chewing, I would think their rulership would come under Mars, whilst 'teeth'(calcium) in general are part of Capricorn/Saturn's realm. By coincidence Mars will be transiting Capricorn, where I believe it is exalted, during the second half of January. You have Saturn-Neptune in Capricorn in the early degrees of the sign, in what looks to be a trine to natal Mars. Extractions (loss of) would seem to refer to Neptune, and Mars itself does refer to 'surgery' of any kind. By second coincidence, Black Moon Lilith (non-manifestation of form....that which never was;) ) is also on 9/10 Libra the second half of January, thus squaring the Saturn-Neptune conjunction from Mars.

If you are allowed to choose a date, there is a traditional astrology rule that this shouldn't be when the moon is in the sign of the part of body upon which surgery occurs

F.

StelliumGoat
12-07-2006, 08:54 PM
On the dates of when I'm thinking of getting it done, the moon will either be in Virgo, Libra, or Scorpio. So moon-wise will this be alright?

Frisiangal
12-08-2006, 09:30 AM
On the dates of when I'm thinking of getting it done, the moon will either be in Virgo, Libra, or Scorpio. So moon-wise will this be alright?


A lot depends upon your feelings regarding eventual extraction.
With both Mars and Saturn in Earth signs natally, transiting Moon in Virgo would be compatible to both. Virgo relates to matter-of-factness regarding physical disorders and Moon would be transiting your 8th house of 'surgery'.
OTOH Moon in Libra is about emotional decision-making. Libra as quincunx and square is incompatible with both Taurus and Capricorn. Libra on 9th house refers to 'health'. Is an extraction a matter of health, do you think?
Moon in Scorpio will relate to 10th house and oppose Mars in Taurus. Too many emotional fears?:rolleyes: But it will sextile Saturn in Cap. that will keep fears under control.

I guess it's a case of 'you pays your money and takes your choice'. Surgery that takes place during the waning period (after full moon) of the Moon will always be less stenuous on the emotions, I should think.

F.

blumen
12-09-2006, 06:38 AM
Teeth, nails and bones are ruled by Saturn. If you want to elect a time for
having your wisdom teeth extracted, then do it before Saturn turns direct.

The more Saturn is detrimented, the better. In this case, we do not want to start doing anything new. We want to get rid of something "old": wisdom teeth. Since we are trying to put an end to something, it is a lot better if its significator is as weak as possible.

Defeating an enemy that is weak and hungry is a lot easier than defeating an
enemy which is strong and well-fed, isn't it?

If you wait until Saturn enters Virgo, the extraction may turn out to be more
difficult or painful. Although it does not gain any dignities, by entering Virgo
Saturn loses debility. It becomes a bit stronger, and hence a bit more difficult
to deal with.

Wait for the opposition orb between Saturn and Neptune to widen as much
as possible. Neptune rules anestethics, and if it opposes Saturn it is possible that you may need to get some more anestethics.

As for the Moon, try and do it when the Moon is in Libra. A Moon in Libra is in the exaltation of Saturn, and at the same time in the domicile of Venus: this is going to make the extraction easier and less painful. Also the Moon will cast easy aspects to both Neptune and Saturn.

Avoid the Moon in Scorpio. Traditionally, it was said that new clothes were not to be cut when the Moon was in Scorpio, because they could become worn out more easily. If you reason by analogy, and try to apply this to the extraction of the wisdom teeth, then the problems that you want to avoid
may resurface in the near future.

The Moon in Virgo could be ok, too, although this does not look like the best placement. Mercury rules the nerves, and when having a widsom tooth extracted you certainly do not want to have any problems with your molar nerves.

Be sure to have your extraction when the Moon is waning. Avoid
the days when the Moon is conjunct or opposite the Sun, or when it is in Aries, Taurus or Capricorn. The Moon should not be in the sign that rules the part on the body on which surgery is performed. Aries and Taurus rule different parts of the head, and Capricorn rules the teeth.

You will probably notice that the election chart for the extraction will show a few hard aspects. Also, squares and oppositions between the transiting planets and your radical planets may be present. This is ok, after all you are going to have surgery, and this must be signalled by the presence of hard aspects involving Mars, Saturn and your personal planets too.

Andonis
12-10-2006, 10:47 PM
Which house in Horary is for dentists?

StelliumGoat
12-11-2006, 08:24 PM
Well, today I had my consultation with my oral surgeon. The date I have set up is December 28, 2006, a little earlier than I would liked, but I had to, due to my schedule. I usually read transits on astro.com but I don't know how to read the transits that aren't for that day. So I've set up a chart for the day of surgery.

Here are the transits for that day:

Sun = Cap (Probably will transit through my 12th)
Moon = Aries (Probably will transit through the 3rd House)
Mercury = Cap (Most likely 12th House)
Venus = Cap (Most likely 1st House)
Mars = Sag (Mars is in the 11th)
Jupiter = Sag (Either 10th or 11th)
Saturn = Leo (Intercepted in my 7th House)
Uranus = Pisces (in the 2nd House)
Neptune = Aquarius (Intercepted in the 1st)
Pluto = Sag (Entering the 12th House)

Thought I should mention this, chiron is in aquarius in my 1st house.

Just wondering does this look like a good date for surgery? I'm little nervous since the moon is in Aries, and a few planets are in Capricorn. Also how does one interpret a transiting planet in an intercepted sign?

StelliumGoat
01-23-2007, 08:16 PM
Well, its been about a month since surgery, and my healing has been going alright. The surgery itself was fast, and I didn't feel a thing of it. I think the worst of it all were the days right after surgery. It wasn't due to pain, but mostly due to hunger. I couldn't really eat anything whole. I had to literally drink all my food, which got boring quickly and drove me nuts. I was VERY grumpy for about two weeks. I was so relieved during the end of the second week that I could slowly eat more food, and that really improved my mood. Unfortunately, sometime last week one of my gums were bothering me so I went back to the surgeon to see what it was. It was an infection, caused by some food that got stuck in my gum. The doctor rinsed it out, and gave me some medication for the infection, and this week I'm doing much better. I just can't wait for it to completely heal. It will take probably another month for it to completely heal. In the time being, I still have to be a little careful when eating, but I'm just glad its over with.